Tactile Strips 03-18-19

Whether by seeing or feeling, passengers know they’re at the edge of a train platform thanks to these ubiquitous bumpy yellow tiles. Invented by Seiichi Miyake, the first tactile warning strips we installed in Okayama, Japan on March 18, 1967 next to a school for the blind. To this day they have helped keep people – including those who are vision-impaired – out of harm’s way while on railway platforms, streets, crosswalks and other public spaces around the world. Miyaki’s ingenious creation is featured on Google.com today, in a CNN article and many other places on the web.

These safety elements are standard on all LIRR station rehabilitations and are already deployed on many LIRR stations systemwide. For information about the LIRR Modernization Program and how it is making travel on Long island easier and more reliable, visit the AmodernLI.com project page – http://www.amodernli.com/projects/.

Tactile Strips 03-18-19

Tactile warning strips are also utilized on subway platforms, shown above, to help keep people safely away from moving trains and the drop to the trackbed below.